Reader mail: Bill Monroe, Schmill Monroe

Our ongoing series, I’m Going Back To Old Kentucky by Richard Thompson, has generated more reader comment than any feature we have yet run on The Bluegrass Blog. Most of what we hear is quite favorable, but a few folks have felt the need to let us know that they don’t like it…  no sir, not one bit.

A number of recognizable bluegrass personages have commented in private, again mostly about how much they enjoy Richard’s A Day In The Life coverage of Bill Monroe’s career, though at least one has found it tiresome.

We heard this morning from a reader who has reacted quite colorfully to the Monroe series…

“Geesh, I am soooo tired of hearing the constant Bill Monroe daily update info. I don’t care where he crapped or who played with him once in a one room school house in West Virginia. Actually, I seldom check out your site nowadays, since it’s the same old same old every day.

News at the speed of bluegrass?? No, more like Bluegrass Blog: solidly stuck in the past!”

When I emailed back to the effect that most of our regular readers find the scroll bar helpful in skipping past content that doesn’t appeal them – and directed him to its location – he responded with an unprintable assessment of my character.

What has our world come to when a bluegrass web site gets flack for posting about Bill Monroe during his centennial?

Oh well… I guess it takes all kinds.

These rare exceptions to the contrary, we are always eager to get feedback from our readers, and appreciate your comments.

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About the Author

John Lawless

John had served as primary author and editor for The Bluegrass Blog from its launch in 2006 until being folded into Bluegrass Today in September of 2011. He continues in that capacity here, managing a strong team of columnists and correspondents.

  • I was fortunate to meet and play with Bill Monroe while working on special assignment for UPS in Nashville in 1991. Bill took me under his wing and taught me some of his famous licks and for that I will forever be grateful. However some folks can’t appreciate what he did for Bluegrass music and for that I can only relate to what Briscoe Darling said when Sheriff Andy Griffith didn’t believe he could make banjo sounds out of a jug…A mans entitled to his opinion.