Ricky Skaggs goes solo

Ricky SkaggsOK…  it’s not what you think.

Ricky Skaggs is doing a solo project, but he is still firmly in place as the fearless leader of Kentucky Thunder. In fact, it’s a solo project in the truest sense of the word.

His next CD, Songs My Dad Loved, is due on September 15 and Ricky played and sang each part on every track. Skaggs plays fiddle, guitar, mandolin and clawhammer banjo on the new CD, and sings harmony as well as lead vocals on memorable classics from The Monroe Brothers and The Stanley Brothers, plus some timeless hymns and Gospel songs.

The album is a tribute to Hobart Skaggs, Ricky’s father, who had been an old time music performer in the first half of the 20th century. Hobart fostered Ricky’s musical interests when he was still a lad, and help sow the seeds that grew into one of the most remarkable careers of any bluegrass musician alive today.

Ricky had a memorable stage debut at a Flatt & Scruggs show before he hit his teens, and was performing as a member of Ralph Stanley & The Clinch Mountain Boys while still in high school. He has always credited his dad, and his mother, Dorothy Skaggs (both now deceased) with encouraging him in his music, and teaching him to sing and love the sound of old time, country and bluegrass music.

Tracks include:

  • Foggy River
  • What Is A Home Without Love
  • Colonel Printess
  • City That Lies Foursquare
  • Little Maggie
  • Sinner You’d Better Get Ready
  • Pickin’ In Caroline
  • I Had But 50 Cents
  • Green Pastures In The Sky
  • Calloway
  • This World Is Not My Home
  • Branded Wherever I Go
  • God Holds The Future In His Hands

This ought to be a good’n.

Share this:

About the Author

John Lawless

John had served as primary author and editor for The Bluegrass Blog from its launch in 2006 until being folded into Bluegrass Today in September of 2011. He continues in that capacity here, managing a strong team of columnists and correspondents.

  • skaggs34

    not to nit pick. but Rick’s dad’s name is spelled Hobert. he was a good feller Hob was. Dorothy, his mother, was equally important in Rick’s musical upbringing.