Kevin Richardson retires from performing

Kevin Richardson has spent most of his adult life as a bluegrass performer. Whether fronting his own group or assisting established artists on stage, he’s spent his career playing the music he loves as a guitarist and a singer. His solid rhythm and lead guitar, and powerful voice, made his a distinctive presence both live and on recordings.

In between stints with Lou Reid & Carolina and The Larry Stephenson Band, Richardson led his own band, Kevin Richardson & Cuttin’ Edge, which came to be known by their initials, KRACE. They recorded a self-titled project for Mountain Fever in 2012.

Here’s video of them doing the album’s opening track at Denton in 2011.

But now comes word that Kevin is stepping away from bluegrass, at least for a time.

“I’m retiring after 20 years of great music with great people. I started at the age of 5 and, being a big fan of Lou Reid, joined my hero in 2000. I played stages I never thought I’d get to play, including the Grand Ole Opry.

I met Larry Stephenson around 2010. Working with Larry is the best job I’ve ever had. I’ve seen people come and go, but working with Kenny Ingram and Larry will always be the highlight of my career.

My family needs me and my granddaughter needs me. With tears in my eyes, I say goodbye for now to bluegrass.”

Let’s hope that whatever is pulling Kevin away from the music amounts to only a short term diversion, and we’ll see him on stage again soon.

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About the Author

John Lawless

John had served as primary author and editor for The Bluegrass Blog from its launch in 2006 until being folded into Bluegrass Today in September of 2011. He continues in that capacity here, managing a strong team of columnists and correspondents.

  • CollapsedLung

    …wait…Richardson was born in 1979, and is thus 38 years old…and he has a GRANDDAUGHTER? I suppose if he had his first baby at 18 or 19, and then his offspring reproduced at 18 or 19, it can be done…but yikes…bluegrassers really start young at pretty much everything.