Béla Fleck and the Marcus Roberts Trio

Across The Imaginary Divide - Bela Fleck and the Marcus Roberts Trio

Béla Fleck has never been one to stick to stereotypes or common expectations for the banjo, or for banjo players in general. He has fans in the bluegrass, new acoustic, jazz, classical and modern funk worlds. Some follow him and his music across that wide spectrum, while others are content to sample from the smorgasbord according to their own tastes.

I have discussed Fleck with bluegrassers who revere his Drive album as iconic, but avert their eyes from his work with The Flecktones. Conversely, I have heard fans of his jazzy, funky sound who are aghast at the notion that he ever played hillbilly music. There’s no pleasing some people, I suppose.

But Béla has always followed his own muse, looking for projects that will expand his experience, and his technical mastery of the instrument. Jazz piano has apparently been on his mind of late, with a 2007 duet album with Chick Corea, and a new record, Across The Imaginary Divide, with The Marcus Roberts Trio just released.

As Fleck and Roberts reveal in this promotional video, the album wasn’t meant for either artist to bend to the other’s style, but to see what happens when they all got together.

 

Across The Imaginary Divide is available now on Rounder Records. Béla will be touring with the Roberts Trio throughout 2012 in support of the album.

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About the Author

John Lawless

John had served as primary author and editor for The Bluegrass Blog from its launch in 2006 until being folded into Bluegrass Today in September of 2011. He continues in that capacity here, managing a strong team of columnists and correspondents.

  • Darren Sullivan-Koch

    You’d think Rounder Records would be excited enough about this neat new project to maybe mention it somewhere—anywhere—on their website. But nope…what’s up with that?

    • There is something in their news section I think.

      • Darren Sullivan-Koch

        You’re right. But it’s pretty buried, with no photos. Considering that this is an important release by two relatively major figures, the fact that it is not on the front page or listed among the new releases is inexcusable. I hope Fleck’s and Robert’s respective management take note.