Moneyland video contest

Moneyland special collectors edition CDWe’ve posted several times previously concerning the latest offering from McCoury Music. The CD Moneyland, is a collection of songs previously released by various artists, along with 4 new songs, and a couple of newly recorded versions of old songs.

The label has just announced a video contest for the album. The contest is open to all, pros and amateurs alike. Contestants are encouraged to create a video short for one of the tracks from the CD. The video can take the form of a music video, a documentary, narrative, or collage of still photos set to the music. Videos are limited in length to the length of the track, plus two minutes. This additional time is allowed for video to adequately tell its story.

A winning film for each song will be selected with a cash prize of $250 dollars being awarded for each. An overall winner will also be selected with a cash prize of $2500 being given to this contestant. The winners will all have press and media coverage, though details of broadcast have yet to be released.

McCoury Music has described the CD as “a hard-hitting look at today’s economic injustice” through song. My guess would be that the vast majority of entries will be from people who agree with the assessment that “economic injustice” exists. Any entries which run contrary to that idea should be interesting though.

The website quotes Del as stating that the CD is not about “party politics” but suggests that it is a timely call to action, “especially in an election year.” Del goes on to say that his hope is that the

music moves you to find a place where you can help–even if it’s just at the voting booth.

The news page on the site features quotes from various media, including this one from incoming IBMA board member Craig Havighurst.

McCoury, one of my musical heroes, is stepping forward boldly with a message that sounds exactly like what Obama (whom I continue to support incidentally) was trying to say…

Full contest rules and details are available at LivingMoneyland.com.

Here’s a recent video interview with Del McCoury and his manager, Stan Strickland, concerning the CD and the contest.

  • mandomaj

    Thanks, Brance, for keeping us updated on the Del’s Moneyland project — and the political slant that goes with it (which is fairly apparent, despite his protestations to the contrary). I’m a huge Del fan, as I know you are too, but I’d prefer to keep election year politics out of my bluegrass library, so I ain’t putting my money into Moneyland.

  • I’ve been really hesitant to comment on this for obvious reasons, but it keeps popping up here again and again….

    I find the premise of this album, website and competition offensively laughable. The very fact that Mr. McCoury is capitalizing on the movement generated by his work reveals the flimsy nature of the very premises it’s coasting on. For him to denigrate our remnants of Capitalism, the only system that allows talented individuals like himself to objectively prosper, is a humorous spectacle. The only reasonable conclusion I can draw from Del’s many ‘calls to action’ is that he’s supporting the cause for more government meddling in the economy, more income redistribution and more sacrifice of individuals for the sake of the collective. Doesn’t the ‘Golden Rule’ lose some of it’s splendor when it becomes compulsory?

    He thinks rural America has it bad now? Just wait until what’s left of our economy is suffocated by more regulation – when those corporate “non hard-working” types stop providing what jobs are left.

    I used to be a Del McCoury fan‚Ķ I really did. His latest endeavor and the surrounding stench has changed that. I appreciate the value in separating artists from their politics, but he’s made that practice a difficult task with this project.

    Thanks Del, that’s just what America needs… more patently un-american progress. Stick to music, when it comes to philosophy and economics, you’re in over your head.

    “economic injustice…” – what a joke.

  • mitch_cumstien

    People are really taking this personally. The “rich get richer, the poor, poorer..” theme is very common this day and age.

  • Kybluegrasser

    Some of you are really letting your skewed political views get in the way of what the reality is for most of middle America.
    Just try reading up on the subject a little instead of spewing your age-old conservative talking points.
    A quick browsing of the internet yields a few interesting facts some of you are obviously oblivious to:

    “According to the most recent data from the IRS, the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans took home a greater share of the nation‚Äôs income in 2006 than in any year of the previous 19. It‚Äôs possibly the biggest income disparity Americans have seen since the Great Depression. The average tax rate of the super-rich was at its lowest level in at least 18 years.”

    “According to the figures, the richest 1% reported 22% of the nation‚Äôs total adjusted gross income in 2006. That is up from 21.2% a year earlier, and is the highest in the 19 years that the IRS has kept strictly comparable figures. The 1988 level was 15.2%. Earlier IRS data show the last year the share of income belonging to the top 1% was at such a high level as it was in 2006 was in 1929, but changes in measuring income make a precise comparison difficult.”

    Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121677287690575589.html

    Rich getting richer, indeed.

  • Hey KY, since you like numbers here are a few more stats from the same year:

    *The top 50% of income earners pay 96.5% of federal income taxes, while the lower 50% pay just 3.5%.

    *The top 25% pay 83.88% of federal income taxes

    *The top 10% pay 65.8% (these are people with an adjusted cross income of about $95,000 or higher)

    *The top 5% pay 54.4%

    *The top 1% pay 34.3% (these are people with an adjusted gross income of about $300,000 or higher)

    Kinda makes your stats look silly huh?

    By the way, nothing you mentioned in your post carries any relevancy, or implies any justification for income redistribution – just hollow, emotional frustration.

    Quit whining about ‘the rich getting richer’ and try to become one of them – then you’ll realize the error in your current mindset.